What They Dont Teach You At Stanford Business School

Stuff you can't learn in B-school: LARRY CHIANG

Archive for the ‘business School’ Category

Time Magazine Coverage

leave a comment »

Feel Like a Fraud? 5 Ways to Be More Confident at Work

 

Larry Chiang, CEO of Duck9, wrote a brilliant article on getting over imposter syndrome

Written by Larry Chiang

November 14, 2016 at 3:51 am

Posted in business School

Ladies, Larry Chiang Is Here in Taipei, Taiwan APRIL 2014

leave a comment »

Yesssss…. I’m going to be heading over to Taipei THIS WEEKEND and I’d love to connect with college students, college entrepreneurs, college programmers, nerds, hackers, and college graduates and 20 somethings. To that end, I’d like to propose a small meet-up, very informal on  Saturday April 5, 2014, at about 8pm. Lets drink water and party in Taipei.

Le Méridien Taipei
38 SongRen Road
Xinyi District
Taipei, 110 Taiwan
Phone: (886)(2) 6622 8000 Fax: (886)(2) 6636 8000

To RSVP pop over to Facebook and write on my Wall or email me at larry@duck9.com with the subject line “TAIPEI.” I’d love to connect via email. I’m not sure how many we’d expect; I suspect it will be something in the 80-to-120 females range.

I will be staying at the Le Méridien Taipei so would prefer to have any after party closer to my hotel

I’m looking forward to visiting Taiwan and meeting my local readers. Remember: This is an informal, bar-type event and not a formal presentation. Think networking, not seminar.

再会! (btw, I copied this from John Biggs. He’s white so his Chinese simplified might not be 100% accurate.Image

I fall asleep when I am tired.

Larry Chiang’s Entrepreneur Week
Image

This is really at Stanford GSB
Image

This comes out 11-11-14.
Image
ImageImageImage
My father Tom Chiang. He is in Taichung with my mom right now. At MIT, I coat-tailed my father and did #TCEET

Written by Larry Chiang

April 3, 2014 at 3:42 pm

10 Things They Don’t Teach You in Business School

leave a comment »

Our guest blogger, Larry Chiang, is an instructive humorist. If you liked “9 VC’s You’re Gonna Want To Avoid“, you’ll like this submission on things that business school will never teach you.

Yes, Uncle Larry neglects his nephew and spoils the niece
BIO: http://tinyurl.com/AmazonBio


Before he’s done, business school will be boiled down into a power point presentation.

By Larry Chiang

-1- How to bend ears and get phone numbers.

People ask me how I get access into the halls of power (Hollywood, DC, Silicon Valley) even though I’m obviously of low IQ. I use my mentor’s technique called M.P.A.F., Multiple Party Agenda Fulfillment. It helps me add value by guessing at their agenda and filling it.

I hypothesize agendas by layering in open ended questions, reading every scrap they have ever written and networking with their associates in an open, transparent fashion. I get meetings with charm, but I get commitment using MPAF.

MPAF has you list out agendas and then you venn diagram together the agendas that overlap. The parties that have overlap you bring together and communicate (and confirm) the new alliance potential.

-2- Kissing alpha butt augments your rolodex. Alphas are always getting nibbled on by ‘betas’ and ‘gammas’. What I mean here by ‘alpha’ is top dog, ‘beta’ is second tier and gamma is a little lower down the totem pole.

Alphas (CEOs, Senators, and Deans) need to be charmed using a five step process

(a) acknowledge their tier one status and refer to book(s), position papers or blog posts they’ve written. This flatters even the most stand-off-ish.

(b) no name dropping to build your own brand

(c) clearly identify your focus and how you will add value. In the short term, you can add value by getting them a refreshment, wrangling them and making introductions to other fans (fetching a whatever-they-need helps too).

Long term, I let them know I blog and am writing a book that I’d like to talk to them about.

(d) allow your time of interaction to have a clear end by saying, “one more thing before I let you go”

(e) close by getting their cell phone number.

Accessing power by helping them first (while kissing butt) is a great manuver they don’t teach at b-school .

-3- Single tasking is the new multi-tasking. People who multi-task tend to do lower quality work. For example, people who read a webpage while multitasking have a rate of comprehension at a fraction of singular focus.

-4- Leverage double entendre. It is an art to say one thing well. It is humorously

default

genius to say something and have it subtly hint at something fun while educating. For example, duck9 stands for deep underground credit knowledge. The acronym is cute but has the double entendre meaning of avoiding 9s on your credit report. Triple entendre would be some motif about the logo but I’m working on that third layer 😉

-5- Use a 41 cent stamp to beat out the HBS/GSB alums. Leverage snail mail to rise over the clutter of email. Regular mail can be your stealth method of communication. In my experience, it is something that separates me from other more qualified candidates.

We’ve all met people who send email ‘thank-you’s. Those are ok but are often over looked and very quickly deleted. As follow-ups to meetings, emails are ok. As reciprocity for something more, I like sending something more significant… like ‘thank-you’ flowers for hosting an event.

My mentor, Mark McCormack, who wrote the book, “What They Don’t Teach You At Harvard Business School“. He recommends a ‘thank-you’ card sent via snail mail. I think a box of 25 thank you cards costs about $7 at the Office Depot. I’m not as good at calculating the ROI on the seven bucks as the U of Chicago GSB grad, but I do make more money.

-6- Get towed. If you’re not getting towed twice per year, you are NOT parking aggressively enough. I don’t know how this applies to b-school, but I think its about bending policies and procedures to your advantage.

-7- Tip bribe comp and tip like a community college valet parker. I said ‘tip’ twice because I like it most. Tipping is a secret lubricant that helps you get things done. When I “work a conference”, I tip really well right away. Magically I get upgraded to a big-boy suite. Coincidentally, I get my car a little faster and I sometimes even get greeted by name at breakfast.

-8- Be sweet and sour. Question, what makes Chinese food taste oh-so-good?! Sweet and sour sauce. Sweet = tipping, sour = micro-management. For example, after the bellhop grabs your bag, you tip two Abe Lincolns and utter, “Here buddy, two nickels for you… And don’t screw this up. I need my stuff up to my room ASAP”.

Having both sweet and sour makes you a better manager. Sour mixed in with sweet is tolerable and makes you a more flavored and memorable communicator.

-9- Exit strategy for your B-school girlfriend. B-school professors coach starting a company with an “exit strategy” in mind. Well, I am here, to say that relationships in b-school need to have an exit strategy too. A clean exit means a clear path out that will keep you both on at least speaking terms or better. Remember, never enter a relationship that you can’t leave a half a dozen ways.

Number 10 I will leave up to y’all.  Please leave your “tip you didn’t learn in b-school” in the comments.  Best tip (as voted on by ME) will get a fleece jacket. Winner will be picked after Thanksgiving break or first dozen comments, whichever comes later.

default


Larry Chiang is the founder of duck9, which educates college student on how to establish and maintain a FICO score over 750. He has testified before Congress and World Bank on credit.

default

He is a frequent contributor to GigaOm’s Found|Read. His earlier posts include: How to Work The Room; 8 Tips On How to Get Mentored ; and 9 VCs You’re Gonna Want To Avoid. You can read more equally funny, founder-focused-lessons on Larry’s Amazon blog.

Written by Larry Chiang

December 13, 2009 at 12:26 pm

Posted in business School

How to Work a Cocktail Party

leave a comment »

Larry Chiang is an instructive humorist. If you liked “10 Things They Don’t Teach You at Business School “, you’ll like this submission on ‘how to work a cocktail party’.

default

Larry’s book release 09-09-09 and BIO: http://tinyurl.com/AmazonBio

Before he’s done, your vig (aka debt) from business school will be signed, sealed and paid off.


By Larry Chiang

Between Thanksgiving and Christmas, there are about a dozen holiday cocktail parties. How we “work” these parties affects our careers much more than we care to admit. Some people are naturally at-ease socializing. I’ve observed how these people work a party and summarized ten years of party-going into 10 fundamental networking tips to help you ace the cocktail circuit.

-1- Define a Small Party Goal.

This IS a work function, so having goals for a party is appropriate. For example, your goal could be to say hi to 10+ people before you say hi to one Rob
Hof of Business Week. If you are someone’s guest or their “Plus One”, your goal could be 90 minutes of pretending to be interested in people you may never see 😉 (and accidentally learning something in the process). Be like Baxter (my shih tzu) and tilt your head and SELL the fact you are listening intently.

-2- Add Value to the Host.

Susan Roane wrote the book, How to Work a Room and she adds value by managing the party’s host. I manage the host by asking if they need help, making sure they get to meet people and I definitely do not text or call the host before the party “to see how its going”. These calls tend to stress the host out because they have their hands full starting the party.

default

My mentor, Mark McCormack, who wrote the book, “What They Don’t Teach You At Harvard Business School“.


2b) Do Not Try to “Out-Alpha” the Host.


No one-upping in any way shape or form. The best questions for the host are upbeat, light and fluffy which require a simple answer. For example, “Aren’t you happy Dave McClure is here?”, “Don’t you look stunning?”, “Congratulation on being a SXSW speaker” or my fave, “Aren’t you a genius for ordering THESE?”

Keep the compliments simple then let the host mingle.

2c) Add Value Before the Party by RSVPing the Right Way.

The best RSVP is enthusiastic, public, promotional and accurate. Similarly, I added value by crashing a party with a VIP guest. At TechCrunch50, I brought my Grammy winning friend Chamillionaire. He was a big hit in the tech community and the hosts remembered me for it.

2d) Add Value by Being More of a Host and Less of a Guest.

Susan Roane talks about how there are two types of people at a party; hosts and guests. People like hosts more because they make introductions, and make people more comfortable. Guests tend to need attention and maintenance.

-3- ‘Sell’ New Ideas at the Party.

Start with your — or your company’s — core competence.  Since Duck9 educates college students about FICO scores and debt minimization, I springboard from the “what-do-you-do-for-work” question with common myths about FICO scores.

This makes me seem substantive and clearly brands me. I’m the “Duck Dude”, with the magnet for a business card who educates college students about their FICO scores.

-4- Attempt to be ONE Person’s Favorite Person.

A big party faux pas is “shoulder surfing”. “Shoulder Surfing” is when you are talking to one person while looking over their shoulder for something better to talk to. I attempt to leave a party with one person saying, “OMG, I hung out with Larry Chiang and he was like a vacation – I love that guy.”

-5- Make Fundamentally Correct Introductions.

Remembering names is 95+% of it. The method of properly making an introduction is outlined in Letitia Baldridge’s book, Executive Manners. In short, you use the person’s name PLUS short summary of who they are. Ideally you introduce junior people to senior, higher ranking (Alphas).

-6- KISS BUTT.

Kiss Beta or Gamma ass in addition to brown-nosing the Alphas. Alpha, Beta, Gamma (and Delta) refer to the pecking order of partygoers. If you meet an Alpha with their entourage of betas and gammas, don’t forget to kiss everyone’s butt because the entourage influences the pack leader’s opinion of you.

-7- Stay Off Your Phone.

If this is the FIRST cocktail mixer you’ve ever been to, PRESS ONE NOW.

-8- Set Aside Your Need to Hook-Up.

It always amazes me how people gravitate to
hot women even at a tech event. My rule of thumb is “no talking to hot women before 11:30pm” (yes, I stole that from Chicago-native Jeremy Piven of Entourage).

I was at a SuperBowl party in Phoenix and it was jam-packed with hot women. All the athletes would absolutely ignore them and palm-press the agents, press, party-producers and the like. Come 11:30 or 11:45pm, people would start coupling off like a mad-dash for musical chairs. Temporarily setting aside your need to hook-up helps you network better.

If you are a woman, you need the opposite strategy. The best tip is “separate, extend and escape”. For example, at a work cocktail party, you want to mix, mingle and not be monopolized and “hot-boxed” (when a person squares you off and is well into your personal space you are getting hotboxed).

(1) First you forecast the separation: ” I think I have to meet my co-worker at the door / bar / table”
(2) Then you extend, “it was nice saying ‘hi’. I’ll come back later”
(3) Finish by turning and walking and you will have escaped.

-9- Master Transitional Phrases.

If you are working the entire cocktail party, you had better ease the start and stop of conversations.

When leaving a group, say, “I’m heading to the bar/bathroom/appetizer tray. Anyone need anything?!”

If you’re meeting a person, while with another person say, “I’m wrangling (aka hosting) my plus one who is late. Can I meet you later?”

If you’re sexually attracted to the person, say “goodness I wanna talk to you all night but my party mentor, Larry Chiang, says I should just get your number so I can keep working the cocktail party”.

The most important transitional phrase is to the host before you leave. Always, always, always: thank the host before you leave.

-10- Follow UP.

Take the business cards you collect and organize them. I put cards into a clear holder within a three ring binder. I also label who I need to follow-up with and how.

** Bonus Party Tip **

What is best thing after a cocktail party? The After-Party that YOU are hosting! It does not have to be at a fancy location. Heck it can even be LaBamba in Lincoln Park, Stanley’s, Gamekeepers or Chinese food if you are in San Francisco.  If you have “alpha game”, have it at the Four Seasons and get Duck9 to sponsor it.

Hey next time you’re at a mixer, show someone this post about ‘working a party’ on your iPhone and email them the link. Yes it is a sneaky way of getting THEIR contact info. Or call me and I’ll be your party crashing buddy. 650-283-8008

CONTEST:  Please leave your “HOW TO WORK A COCKTAIL PARTY” tip in the comments.  Best tip (as voted on by ME) will get a fleece jacket. Winner will be picked after Thanksgiving break or first ten comments, whichever comes later.

default

Larry’s book release 09-09-09 and BIO: http://tinyurl.com/AmazonBio

default

Larry Chiang is the founder of duck9, which educates college students on how to establish and maintain a FICO score over 750. He has testified before Congress and World Bank on credit.


He will be a frequent contributor to Business Week’s blog on “What They Don’t Teach You at Business School. His earlier posts at GigaOm include: How to Work The Room; 8 Tips On How to Get Mentored ; and 9 VCs You’re Gonna Want To Avoid. You can read more equally funny, founder-focused-lessons on Larry’s Amazon blog.

Written by Larry Chiang

December 13, 2009 at 12:24 pm

Posted in business School

My 10 Best B-Schools and How They Can Help You Too

leave a comment »

Larry Chiang is an instructive humorist. If you liked “10 Things They Don’t Teach You at Business School ” and “How to Work a Cocktail Party“, you’ll like his newest submission: “My 10 Best B-Schools and How They Can Help You Too”.

default

Larry’s book release 09-09-09 and BIO: http://tinyurl.com/AmazonBio


Before he’s done, you’ll have built up your resume to the point that business schools will be recruiting you like a college basketball phenom.


By Larry Chiang

Have you seen the Business Week top B-School rankings?!

I do not qualify for any of them thanks to my tumultuous engineering undergrad career and that fact got me hecka mad. My pain is your gain.

Schools for learning about business enthrall me and capture my imagination. In the same way Jesus saw 12 rocks to sit on as a church, I see the “school for business” EVERYWHERE.

Here are my 10 best B-Schools and hopefully they will help you out-earn, out-flank and leap-frog hundreds of tier one MBAs who are neck deep in school loans.

-1- Working for your Alpha Uncle. Working for your alpha father (or worse father-in-law) is near impossible. Working for your dad’s brother is near ideal. He loves you  because he is blood and mentors you — but if and WHEN you start making dumb mistakes, he has enough separation to not take your temporary stupidity as a reflection of his genetic make-up.

-2- PaCC Law School. Here PaCC stands for Palo Alto Community College aka Stanford University Law School (SLS). Laws govern the rules of business so mastering the ground rules help you play the game.

SLS has outreach programs and open source learning agendas meaning you can learn what they learn if you buy the books and teach yourself. If you want to uncover even more, Hoover Institute hosts great guest speakers on cutting edge legal topics and has an email list open to the public.

-3- Small Claims Court. After learning laws, reading about torts and claims and studying contract law, it’s time to practice. I recommend small claims court where you file a case, read about procedures, prepare exhibits and present before a live judge. After my first win against an uninsured motorist, I even learned to collect on a claim by encumbering a driver’s license.

Getting back to legal basics is helpful. Similarly, the Cato Institute passes out Constitutions to congressman.

-4- Prison. Entering an environment with clear and ever changing pecking order is tough to swallow. My biggest lesson from prison / jail: Learn how to take it temporarily in the rear before exacting your revenge.

Knee-jerk revenge only lands you in solitary for a week while your enemy preps, plans and gathers resources. Setting aside your need for short-term revenge gratification is a lesson from my fave book, “What They Don’t Teach You At Stanford Business School“.

-5- The Univesity Club bar after 11pm on a Tuesday. I learn here when alpha males are dee-runk and confessional. Show you can keep a secret and you get a time extension to stay in this secret society. Prove you can keep a secret under the duress of interogation and you will be granted life-long membership.

-4- The Reading Room. I read at the Borders next to my dorm room in Palo Alto, California all-the-time.

default

My mentor, Mark McCormack, who wrote the book, “What They Don’t Teach You At Harvard Business School“.

I also read good stuff on the Internet (i.e. My blog has my favorite sources). And when I go to conferences, I effen TAKE NOTES on how I’m gonna apply what was just said.

Art Moreno, founder of Universal Outdoor and owner of the Anaheim Angels, is one of the best note-takers ever. I wanna be a billionaire just like him.

-5- The Sales Floor of the Car Dealership. There is something gritty and granular about executing one of the largest transactions in a person’s life: buying a car. Village Pontiac in Naperville IL was one of my best learning experiences ever and I see it as pivotal in my current ability to outflank smarter VCs and CEOs with tier one MBAs. It taught me how to move product, prospect sales leads, sell on the phone, boil down complicated car loans and manage a team of sharks from stealing MY commission.

-6- The Scottsdale Bible Church Men’s Retreat. Scottsdale AZ has the best church ever and I crashed their annual Men’s Retreat. I learned that if you’re heart is not right, you’re not gonna stay a millionaire.

I also listened to the mistakes men twice my age made and I (as sure as mentor rose from the dead for about 100 days and was witnessed by about 500-600 people) WILL NOT MAKE THOSE SAME MISTAKES.

I call this leveraging OPE: Other People’s Experience.

-7- The blogger pit at TC50TechCrunch50 had a blogger pit which was the first four rows. 

I learned about how bloggers compose stories, networked with each other, shared sources and built comraderie.

-8- Mistakes-ville. This mistakes I have made are all in my personal love life. I avoid work mistakes by learning from OPE (point #6).

-9- Mentors. Mentors are great only if you listen. I write about how to attract a good mentor. My mentor lineage reads like Top 10 list of billionaires who are, street-smart, centered and philanthropic.

Read about how I woo them at
http://gigaom.com/2007/09/04/8-tips-on-how-to-get-mentored/

-10- The Movie Theatre.
Movies mirror life’s lessons and here are some great movies that teach about business.

Ironman. Peter Stark is the movie’s CEO and I summarized “10 Things Ironman Teaches about Entrepreneurship“.
Top Gun. Maverick gets mentored by “Viper”, ‘Goose’ and “Charlie”. These are superstar mentor, junior mentor and cohort mentor (respectively) and all in my Chapter 4.
Color of Money. Paul Newman educates Tom Cruise about how to work a pool hall.
Wall Street. Gordon Gecko educates Bud Fox on how to work Wall Street.

default

Larry’s book release 09-09-09 and BIO: http://tinyurl.com/AmazonBio

default

Larry Chiang is the founder of Duck9, which educates college students on how to establish and maintain a FICO score over 750. He has testified before Congress and World Bank on credit.

He will be a frequent contributor to Business Week’s blog on “What They Don’t Teach You at Business School”. His earlier posts at GigaOm include similar topics of: How to Work The Room; 8 Tips On How to Get Mentored ; and 9 VCs You’re Gonna Want To Avoid. You can read more equally funny, founder-focused-lessons on Larry’s Amazon blog.

Written by Larry Chiang

December 13, 2009 at 12:20 pm

Posted in business School

Raise Your FICO While You’re an MBA Student

leave a comment »

Larry Chiang writes about business school. If you liked “10 Things They Don’t Teach You at Business School ” and “How to Work a Cocktail Party“, and “My 10 Best B-Schools and How They Can Help You Too“,  then have a look at his latest topic: Raising Your FICO While You’re in an MBA Program.

default

Larry’s book release 09-09-09 and BIO

Before he’s done, your FICO credit score will jump even while you take on thirty grand more in scholarly debt.


By Larry Chiang

Congrats on getting into your MBA program.

If you are one of the lucky few on company scholarship, count yourself fortunate. If you’re financing it yourself, lets boost your future school loan financing alternatives by raising your FICO score.

Yes, my soon-to-be captain of industry, you CAN manipulate, hack and alter your FICO credit score for the better. I am your mentor for “deep underground credit knowledge” and am a master of all things insightful and mundane with regards to credit score. Google me… I’m sort of a big deal :-]

Thank me by sending text message love to 650-283-8008. Call it and be freaked out when I answer it. Or be overly courteous and email chiang9@duck9.com, but include my cell to bust through my spam filter.

Here are 9 tips to raise FICO.

-1- Urban Myths Sink Ships.
The credit industry wants you dumb, stupid and in the dark. For example, the industry quotes the average FICO score to be 678 or even as high as 700+. The real average credit score is 585.

-2- Get a FICO Mentor.
To the benefit of my twelve readers this week, you can use my cell number or Facebook Austin TX network page and I will mentor you. Who am I? A guy who has credit educated peeps and is now writing a tell-all book.
http://www.WhatTheyDontTeachYouAtStanfordBusinessSchool.com

-3- Snail Mail is Your BFF.
Snail mail is mail sent with a 41c stamp. BFF is ‘best friend forever’.

I have made millions steering people towards a higher FICO score. The absolute biggest secret is that postage paid, old school stamps preserve your credit rights. Remember, FCBA stands for “Fair Credit Billing Act”  — not the Fair Credit Biatching Act. Yes, 800 number systems were set-up to short-circuit your rights because voicing a complaint does not document your problem in the eyes of the law (FCBA and FCRA –“Fair Credit Reporting Act”).

-4- Know Your Derogatories.
Dispute borderline negatives after running your credit report. A huge urban myth is that getting a credit report hurts your credit score… it does NOT. I repeat, getting your own credit report does not hurt your credit.

default

My mentor, Mark McCormack, who wrote the book, “What They Don’t Teach You At Harvard Business School“.

Checking your own credit does not hurt your credit because it is a “consumer inquiry”. There are three types of inquiries; consumer, advertiser and credit. Credit inquiries are the only ones that hurt your credit. Print and mail the from HERE http://www.duck9.com/free-credit-report-form.htm

-5- Visualize Growth.
Track your FICO progress on a thermometer. Use one like the ‘Jump-rope-a-thon’ fundraising thermometer that you used in grade school.

-6- Get a Fake Mini Loan.
Make small purchases on a Visa/MC account and pay off in full. This is your fake mini loan: owing $20 to American Express, Discover or Capital One Visa. Credit bureaus make no distinctions between $15.50 paid on-time versus $15,500 paid on time. Ignore leveraging this TIP at your own peril. Procrastinate taking action on this TRUTH and risk wallowing in the lower percentiles.

ACTION: Take two seconds and fill this out and mail it in. http://www.duck9.com/free-credit-report-form.htm

-7- Give Good Google.
Get text message reminders you send yourself via google calendar. On the11th and 21st of every month, I login to EVERY ACCOUNT to make sure all are up-to-date.

I also list out every debt obligation on a manilla folder. For built in redundency, I also get paper bills (to my new dorm address).

-8- Bastard Bills Are Killer.
Find the bastard bill(s) and deal with it/them. An example of a bastard bill is a parking ticket from a city you visited. It grows from a $20 violation to some amount over $100 (almost always). Settle this out by negotiating directly with the original biller (and not the collection agency that bought the debt).

For example, City Of Beverly Hills cited you for a $20 ticket. You ignored it and now the bill is in collections for 5x the original amount. Paying the collector is a mistake. Dealing with the collector and listening to their threats and misinformation is a big, big mistake.

-8b- Orphan bills suck too.
Orphans develop when three people share a utility bill, but no one pays the last bill and YOUR name is on the bill. If your name is on the bill, your credit report will get hit.

SOLUTION: Pay bastards and orphans with a physical check. Why?! Checks are legal documents that tip to scale in your favor. Here is how: In the ‘memo section’ of the check, clearly label the bill to be paid and reference number, “parking ticket  6707-9805 + penalties PAID IN FULL”

Once the check is cashed, you now have the matter cleared if you keep a digital picture or photocopy to present to the credit bureaus.

-9- Document It All In Writing.
Complaining in written form preserves your rights. Emailing or calling does not. See my diatribe on FCBA — “Fair Credit Billing Act”. Complain in triplicate to get RESULTS: write in and cc Complaints.com and CreditCard.org.

-BONUS FICO CREDIT TIP- Pay It Forward.
Cut and paste this blog article to your Facebook in a note. Tell other people about what you learned here. This POST IS NOT copywritten (including this Business Week piece) so cut and paste to pass this advice forward 🙂

If you need written authorization, email me larryChiang@duck9.com. Please cite this blogpost and link back.

default

Larry’s book release 09-09-09 and BIO: http://tinyurl.com/AmazonBio

default

Larry Chiang is the founder of Duck9, which educates college students on how to establish and maintain a FICO score over 750. He has testified before Congress and World Bank on credit.

He will be a frequent contributor to Business Week’s blog on “What They Don’t Teach You at Business School“. His earlier posts on his last blogging assignment at GigaOm included: How to Work The Room; 8 Tips On How to Get Mentored ; and 9 VCs You’re Gonna Want To Avoid. You can read more equally funny, founder-focused-lessons on Larry’s Amazon blog.

default

Written by Larry Chiang

December 13, 2009 at 12:14 pm

Posted in business School

Working a Twitter Party, Take 2

leave a comment »

Larry Chiang offers a window into how business works. If you liked “10 Things They Don’t Teach You at Business School “, “Raise Your FICO While You’re An MBA Student“, and “How to Work a Cocktail Party“, you’ll like his newest submission: “Working a Twitter Party, Take 2”.

default

Larry’s book releases 09-09-09

Before he’s done, you’ll have a cell phone packed with contacts you can text message for superstar advice without having $30k/year in tuition debt.

By Larry Chiang

Twitter is something I do really, really well.

The new website setting the world afire answers the question, “What are you doing?”. The appeal is the simplicity: you do it in under 140 characters.  Katheryn Boehret talks about “How Birds of a Feather Twitter Together“. My town loves, loves, loves Twitter. Yes, I live in Northern California.

Twitter is too new to be taught in business school but understanding and leveraging micro-blogging is important NOW. The Twitter Party is virtual and real.  Here is over a year of my Twitter knowledge boiled down into my patented Top Ten Tips format.

(1) Build Your Brand.

Brian Solis writes about PR 2.0 where traditional media is getting outflanked by social media. Build your brand by picking a Twitter focus and sticking to a theme. Me?! I am the FICO credit dude that blogs about entrepreneurship and “What They Don’t Teach at Business School”.

(2) Amplify and Publicize.

Cut and paste material you are a fan of by “at-ing” people.
For example, I’ll be your BFF if you tweeted (i.e. posted a Twitter message), “@larryChiang, loved your article on Business Week about Twitter http://tinyurl.com/twitter20

(3) Kiss Professor Butt.

Amplify and publicize your reach school’s professors to angle in for the inside track. It might possibly help you get into a better business school, but I would not know first hand about b-school admission because I am zero for three.

(4) Get Behind a Parade.

Summize.com will list out the top ten phrases. They have a hash tag (“#”) before them sometimes. #bwe08 was for BlogWorld Expo, #ventureSummit08 was for the VC Conference in Half Moon Bay, and #larryChiang sounds like a girls gone wild party (get it, ‘pound Larry Chiang’).

Anyway, starting parades are hard but identifying trends and getting behind momentum is easy, fun and slightly diabolical.
(5) Crazy Ivan Works for Me.

Aboard a submarine, a “Crazy Ivan” is where the sub captain comes to a full stop to check to see if anyone is following them in the baffles. Baffles are water turbulence caused by the propeller. Water turbulences renders sonar to be useless so sub captains crazy ivan to see what is in their wake.

Twitter’s equivalent is to check for people who follow you and possibly follow them back. I watch my ratio of “Friends” to “Followers” like a hawk because I wanna keep 1:1 or better.

(6) Run a Twitter Contest.

I love contests to generate interest for the topic I am trying to educate people on. For money, I credit educate people and bribe them with pizza and contests where everyone wins something. On Twitter, I reward those who follow and read my tweets with easy to win contests.

For example, I was at TechCrunch50 and tweeted, “First person to tweet one of my GigaOm blog posts (about Twitter Party) gets a Nordstrom’s gift card”. @puhala won it.

(7) Import the Real World Into Twitter.

Twitter Parties are starting to pop up in the real world. These tweetups used to be nerdy computer folk but now are beginning to be mainstream.  I have met great friends such as @jowyang@ec and @flackette.

Practice normal Twitter etiquette by following those who follow you. I use my PDA on the spot. For example, I was at Rick Calvert’s BlogWorldExpo where the majority of the conference twittered and I input Twitter handles directly into my Sidekick. When I was doing my post conference write-up, I could easily list out my favorite Twitter peeps.

Recently, these twitter folks made great impressions on me: @michaelCummings @lmclean @cloud8 @whitneyM @mucheazy @appley @lmclean @prRobin @cynk and @jjToothman

default

My mentor, Mark McCormack, who wrote the book, “What They Don’t Teach You At Harvard Business School“.

(8) Get Mentored and Find Mentors.

I hone in on a handful of topics I search via Summize.com. I am interested in FICO, credit scores and “SF + Parties”. Other people have found me when I tweet about entrepreneurship. Summize.com also has an iPhone application that pulls your searches together.

People who share interests can get mentored by pure strangers connected only by similar interests via Twitter.

(9) Fortune Cookie Flavor.

I have an unfair Twitter advantage because I love fortune cookie wisdom (because I am Chinese). Adding to my momentum is I read and regurgitate a lot (see Mark McCormack’s book). This translates into good tweets. If you want good tweets, make them feel fortune cookie-worthy.

Check me out on Twitter… I am kind of a big deal 😉
P.S. I took fortune cookie flavored text messages one step further: I started a company that sends people text messages to raise their FICO.

(10) Avoid Twitter Pitfalls.

(a) Don’t add 100 people before you reach 100 tweets.
Starting slow is OK. Unfollowing those that don’t follow you back within a week is ok too.
(b) Don’t use a weird name people won’t remember
I use LarryChiang because if someone wants to stalk/kill me, they’d spend a dollar to run my credit report which lists EVERYTHING.
(c) Don’t tweet about the overly mundane but try to share something real and confessional.

Good luck out there and text me during my office hours: 11:11am/pm give or take 15 minutes. This article is at http://tinyurl.com/twitter20 so tweet it!!! Thx @tylerWillis. I am also on Facebook in the Austin TX network… why Texas?! It is because I started ‘Austin Secret Society of Entrepreneurs’ (#asse9). If you see a typo or grammatical error, email me with your cell in the subject line! larry@larrychiang.com 🙂 If you host a tweetUp like #svTweetUp, post it in the comments BELOW.

default

Larry’s book release 09-09-09 and BIO: http://tinyurl.com/AmazonBio

default

Larry Chiang is the founder of Duck9, which educates college students on how to establish and maintain a FICO score over 750. He has testified before Congress and World Bank on credit.

He is a frequent contributor to Business Week’s blog on “What They Don’t Teach You at Business School“. For fun, he crashes dorm cafeterias, eats at sorority houses and plays basketball on college campuses across the USA.

Written by Larry Chiang

December 13, 2009 at 12:11 pm

Posted in business School